Tag Archives: Video Games

Super Lucky’s Tale | First Chapter

Super Lucky’s Tale is a platform game exclusively on Xbox One/Windows. It is a sequel to the mobile game Super Lucky. This is the 1st Chapter of the Tale. I die some as I get used to the movements. It’s pretty fun, pretty fluid, your standard platformer.

This footage is from our Mixer channel: https://ift.tt/2lhhSaM

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Three Sports Games Finish in Top Ten Sales for 2014

With NPD reports in for December the entirety of 2014 can be analyzed and three sports games finished in the top ten of sales for the year. The three in question are regulars when rounding up the best-sellers annually.

Madden NFL 15 finished as the second biggest seller in 2014. Only Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare was able to top it. NBA 2K15 finished the year in seventh place and FIFA 15 came through in ninth place.

It’s important to note that NPD only covers North America. NBA 2K and FIFA are far stronger properties than Madden overseas. FIFA has been the top selling game in the world for several years now, and more recently has shown impressive growth in the US. Its first appearance in the NPD top ten came in 2012. Madden finished the year strongest of the group, as it usually does, coming in third in December but NBA 2K15 still has six months ahead of it where it will continue to place among the best sellers.

Madden NFL 15 Roster Update #5 Details

The roster update following week three of the season for Madden NFL 15 is now available to download on all systems. Check out complete details on all the changes found in this latest update by viewing the spreadsheet here.

Players on the rise include Calais Campbell (+1 to 97), Earl Thomas (+1 to 96), Kyle Williams (+1 to 96), Muhammad Wilkerson (+2 to 95), Julio Jones (+2 to 94), Tyron Smith (+2 to 94), Kam Chancellor (+1 to 93), Jason Hatcher (+1 to 91), Charles Woodson (+2 to 90), Martellus Bennett (+2 to 89), Le’Veon Bell (+3 to 88), Brandon Flowers (+2 to 88), Kenny Vaccaro (+2 to 87), Corey Graham (+2 to 86), Jon Ryan (+3 to 85), Aaron Williams (+3 to 84), Rashad Jennings (+2 to 84), Kyle Fuller (+4 to 82), Kirk Cousins (+3 to 81), Ryan Mundy (+3 to 81), Devin Hester (+2 to 78), John Brown (+3 to 76), and Austin Davis (+3 to 75). Continue reading Madden NFL 15 Roster Update #5 Details

No Demo for NBA 2K15

All along it appeared unlikely that 2K Sports would be offering a pre-release demo for NBA 2K15 after passing on doing so with 2K14. That has turned out to be the case with Operation Sports getting confirmation that there will be no demo for the game.

The NBA 2K series is in a position where a demo may not be a necessity but the decision can still be legitimately questioned. While companies have started to move away from the traditional demo (MLB: The Show was really the first and there wasn’t one for Madden NFL 15 either) with the thinking that they may do more harm than good there’s still an audience that can be reached through them. Continue reading No Demo for NBA 2K15

NCAA Ordered to Talk Settlement in O’Bannon Case; Eventual Resolution Will Determine Future of College Sports Video Games

Last week the judge in the Ed O’Bannon class-action case vs the NCAA ordered the two sides to enter settlement talks. Naturally questions have started to come in about whether this could accelerate a return of college football (and other sports) video games.

There is no longer a video game element to the case – although Sam Keller has continued to argue that he was not a part of the earlier settlement that got Electronic Arts and Collegiate Licensing Company out of it. A conclusion to litigation that would provide an outline for players to be paid (whether from share of broadcasting rights, personal endorsements, and/or merchandising) could open the possibility of video games back up. 

It’s very unlikely that a settlement will be reached which would mean the case proceeding through the lengthy process that with appeals could be five years away from a conclusion. There is no requirement that the sides attempt to reach one in good faith – just that they attend the required mediation. Even if a the two sides came to a settlement the specific terms would be critical.

EA could manage paying collegiate athletes $50-$100 a season. That’s essentially what they did with the $40 million settlement. With NCAA Football establishing a successful Ultimate Team mode they could afford additional costs especially when being able to promote real players officially in the game would likely increase sales of the product. Going much higher than that though, or having a system where players negotiate their own appearance fees, could make it more difficult to financially justify.

Earlier/Summary Below

The player likeness lawsuit against the NCAA, CLC, and Electronic Arts is the culmination of two high profile filings that were combined as led by Sam Keller and Ed O’Bannon (and O’Bannon now heads it up). It alleges improper use of player likeness through various forms of merchandise and media including video games in which the parties in question conspired to avoid paying players for their rights. Some interesting details and claims regarding the case at hand were revealed when EA was reentered as a defendant after initially being dismissed.

EA originally won a previous case regarding player likeness with the courts ruling video games are artistic works rather than commercial speech and therefore protected by the First Amendment. The Supreme Court in 2011 established forms of media, producing expressive works of art, are not subject to judgments based on incorporating someone’s name or likeness. That dismissed case however, involving Ryan Hart, has resurfaced after an appeals court reversed a decision based on that argument.

Recent uncovered emails have shown that NCAA representatives were well aware that players in games were based off real-life players. At one point the NCAA and EA had nearly reached an agreement to have actual player names included in the products. The EA Locker / Roster Share feature was a fallback option. With momentum clearly on the plantiffs’ side NCAA reps have begun to publicly express concern over the future of collegiate sports. A former EA Sports producer admitted players in NCAA games were based off real athletes.

The discovery of Tim Tebow’s name being in NCAA Football 10 could throw another wrench into EA’s series of arguments. Depositions from former Alabama wide receiver Tyrone Prothro and UConn basketball guard Tate George support the defendant’s reasoning for denying class action certification. The class action hearing resulted in the judge heavily questioning the legitimacy of a potential class and insisting a current athlete be involved. The judge required current athletes be added as plaintiffs for that party to have representation if the case is certified as class action. Six current college football players were added as plaintiffs in mid-July.

EA is now arguing to be dismissed as a defendant in the suit. A major defense for the company however was recently struck down by an appeals court.

This consolidated case in California if certified as class action would go to trial – barring a settlement – and ultimately be the determining factor of how the NCAA proceeds in the future handling broadcasting rights, merchandising, and video games. Should a negative result come down, which one analyst has pegged as being a potential loss of $1 billion for EA, it would likely not just end the NCAA Football series but also with it any realistic possibility of college sports games being made in the future. The trial now is slated to begin June 9, 2014. Appeals following a decision could extend the fight through 2020.

[RESOLUTION] EA and the CLC have settled the lawsuit. EA Sports will no longer produce a college football game. Getting out of the lawsuit only cost EA and CLC $40 million.

U.S. Senator: Video Games Gave Sandy Hook Shooter ‘A False Sense Of Courage’ (Via Kotaku)

Let the scapegoating continue.  Adam Lanza, the person who shot and killed 26 people at Sandy Hook elementaryin Connecticut last month, reportedly played Call of Duty, among other games. So for quite a while now, pundits and politicians have been drawing links between his heinous actions and the video games he played.

Most recently we have Senator Chris Murphy, a newly-elected Democrat in CT, who spoke yesterday during a press conference to introduce a bill on assault weapons.

“I think there’s a question as to whether he would’ve even driven in his mother’s car in the first place if he didn’t have access to a weapon that he saw in video games that gave him a false sense of courage about what he could do that day,” the senator said.

This is probably a good time to remind the world that there is no scientific evidence linking violent video games and violent behavior.

With Recent Rash Of Gun Violence, Videos Games Have Been Drawn Into The Debate

State Sen. Leland Yee’s ban on sales of violent games to minors was tossed by the high court.

 

When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2011 that there was no proof that violent video games caused minors to act violently, the video game industry believed an age-old debate was finally over. But in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook killings, the video industry is once again under scrutiny. This time, President Obama’s gun control initiative includes funding a new, $10 million study on violence in entertainment, including video games.

And that’s not all. Since the Newtown, Conn., tragedy, lawmakers in Missouri and Utah have introduced bills that would levy a tax on violent video game sales and make it a crime to sell certain games to minors.

State Sen. Leland Yee, who authored the 2005 California bill to ban sales of ultra-violent video games only to have the Supreme Court rule it unconstitutional, still vehemently believes the issue is a “public health matter.”

“Gamers have got to just quiet down,” Yee, D-San Francisco, said in an interview Tuesday. “Gamers have no credibility in this argument. This is all about their lust for violence and the industry’s lust for money. This is a billion-dollar industry. This is about their self-interest.”

Industry scapegoated?

While those kinds of sentiments anger many game players, who believe their favorite pastime is once again being made a scapegoat for violent behavior, the industry may only have itself to blame for attracting critics. After all, some of the most profitable games in the $7 billion industry – the ones that developers most heavily promote and advertise – are violent first-person shooter/slasher games like “Call of Duty: Black Ops II” and “Assassin’s Creed III.”

“It’s not all about shooting people in the head and guts everywhere, but that’s what the public perception is, and probably rightfully so,” said Kris Graft, editor-in-chief of the San Francisco-based site Gamasutra, which along with its print magazine sibling, Game Developer, covers the video game industry. “There is plenty of diversity in video games, but I don’t think it’s being highlighted enough.”

Indeed, a list of last year’s top 10 best-selling games, according to the research firm NPD Group, shows an equal mix of first-person shooters – which traditionally cater to the industry’s most loyal audience of hard-core gamers – and the sports and dance games that can’t be considered violent.

The best-selling game was the latest installment of the war simulation “Call of Duty” franchise from Activision of Santa Monica. In third place was “Halo 3,” from a Microsoft subsidiary, 343 Industries of Kirkland, Wash., and in fourth place was “Assassin’s Creed III” from France-based Ubisoft Entertainment, which has its North American headquarters in San Francisco.

But No. 2 was the long-successful football game franchise “Madden NFL 13,” from Redwood City’s Electronic Arts, while Ubisoft’s “Just Dance 4” finished in the fifth spot. The top 10 also included the basketball game “NBA 2K13” from Novato’s 2K Sports. Continue reading With Recent Rash Of Gun Violence, Videos Games Have Been Drawn Into The Debate